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Why Wall Textures are Important for Haunted Houses

October 7, 2014 - Haunted House
Creating thought out and creative wall textures are a great way to take your haunt to the next level. Walking through a haunted house with all one toned walls splattered with blood gets boring quickly and screams traditional haunted house.
Use your storyline, try to make your wall textures realistic so guests forget they’re at an attraction. There are plenty of simple tricks to achieve this effect.
Start with your storyline. Say your haunt takes place in an abandoned warehouse for example. What would the walls look like? If you’re thinking paint all the walls grey and maybe tag some of the walls with spray paint then you’re taking the easy way out. What kind of warehouse was it? What reason did it close? How should it look now? These are the questions you should be asking yourself. Maybe it was an old tennis shoe factory, a snack cake production house, or even an amazon storage warehouse.
Take your narrative and design walls that go accordingly. A boiler room for instance, you think an industrial room with walls covered in pipes. Layering is what is going to yield the best results for you. So first you paint the walls a dirty grey mixed in with saw dust to give the walls an eroded texture. Cutting a few holes in the walls to build effects like exposed rebar that would be logical in a dilapidated industrial space. You then attach cardboard or PVC tubes all over the walls through out the room. Painting and detailing the tubes to look just like pipes. Maybe a few are rusted, some have holes, and some are broken with mold growing out. All easy effects that can be achieved with saw dust, foam glue, paint, and detailing.
These highly specific wall textures are what really begin to sell your room to your guests. Soon they’re forgetting they are at a Halloween attraction and instead suspend belief long enough to walk (maybe even run) through the haunt that you have now created. The detailed wall textures begin to carry the illusion on their own combined with your furniture, props, bodies, actors, lighting, and music.